Right, Wrong, and Risky Words with SEO

We all know that Google takes the cake for being the top search engine, but did you know that websites get about 90 percent of their search engine traffic from Google searches?  Statistics like these should play a major factor in how you might go about writing your next press release.  
My professor for my New Writing and Media Relations class spoke about a great starting point for utilizing Search Engine Optimization, or SEO. First you must evaluate your good words, risky words, and just plain old bad words to use in a press release. He started by having us write a statement for a client. He then directed us to a site called Wordle, which allows you to plug in a group of words to create a visual representation of how often a word or group of words is used.  The key was to see which words were prominent, if your bad or risky world were small in comparison to the good words you should be highlighting. By seeing which words appear most often, you can tweek and change your press release as it relates to which words you want to appear most.  
By having a visual representation you can understand how Google views your content. When you use your good words more often, they become key words which will be associated with your Google results in searches. Essentially when your content has a correlation with a word or set of words it is factored into Google’s algorithms which helps users search best find their results. 
If you want to think about how you want your client to be viewed or associated, this should help you evaluate your good, bad, and risky words.  By recognizing these words using Wordle, you can then emphasize key words to highlight the most important content in your press release resulting in successful SEO.

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